Canlyniadau 181–200 o 271 ar gyfer speaker:Mr Charles Peat

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Charge of National Defence Contribution. (21 Meh 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: The hon. Member is confusing me with another hon. Member with a somewhat similar name.

Finance Bill.: Clause 2. — (Extension of period of stabilisation of rates of Imperial preference.) ( 9 Meh 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I should like to put one point of view which I think has not been expressed before. The right hon. Gentle- man the Member for Caithness and Sutherland (Sir A. Sinclair) claimed that the horizon of the Government's policy of tariffs was blurred. I can well believe that that is his view, as lie is one of those who hold that the true and undiluted Liberal doctrines are still good, in the world...

Finance Bill.: Clause 2. — (Extension of period of stabilisation of rates of Imperial preference.) ( 9 Meh 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I did not use the word "humbug" in any personal sense. What I referred to as humbug was the suggestion that to threaten to uproot Imperial Preference in six months without consulta- tion with the other parties to it would be doing nothing to contribute to trade agreements between this country and America.

Orders of the Day — Income Tax.: National Defence Contribution. (27 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I desire to support the plea of my hon. Friend the Member for East Aberdeen (Mr. Boothby) for a revival in international trade to support our Income Tax. I want to draw the attention of the House to a sinister influence which is growing up to thwart that revival. I refer to double Income Tax. We are accustomed to refer to trade barriers, meaning the restrictions that we all know, like...

Orders of the Day — Income Tax.: National Defence Contribution. (27 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I hope the hon. Member for East Hull (Mr. Muff) will forgive me if I do not follow him in his spirited appeal to the Chancellor to see that every Englishman does his duty in the way of making a contribution to the National Defence. I am sure that the hon. Member appreciates that the National Government have so far seen that every Englishman has done his duty, and the last proposal of the...

Orders of the Day — Income Tax.: National Defence Contribution. (27 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I do not want to hit up taxes, as he said, just for the fun of the thing. I tried to explain that if you have exceptional circumstances where the growth of industry may be exceptional, pruning is necessary. In the ordinary course of normal trade I do not think that it is necessary; in exceptional circumstances it is. In August, 1921, the price of No. 3 Cleveland pig iron was quoted at 297s....

Oral Answers to Questions — Income Tax. (20 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he is aware that the discount of 2½ per cent. on Income Tax paid before the due date is refused if no request for such discount is made at the time of payment, even though such a request for discount be received a few days after the payment of the tax; and whether this is the general practice?

Oral Answers to Questions — Income Tax. (20 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: Will not my right hon. and gallant Friend's Department take some action to bring their methods more into line with ordinary business and common sense?

Oral Answers to Questions — Roadstone and Gravel Quarries (Local Authorities). (15 Ebr 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: asked the Minister of Health how many county and other local authorities in England and Wales own or work roadstone or gravel quarries; what accounts are published; and whether he will insist on the publication of the details of costs, including the correct proportion of the general overhead costs of the authority, so that the ratepayers may compare the final cost of the stone with contract...

Import Duties (Finance Act, 1936, and Import Duties Act, 1932). (22 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: This Debate so far must be very gratifying to the steel industry. We have had a review of the operations of the industry in the last two years and the speeches must be regarded as most favourable to it. I am glad that the hon. Member for Motherwell (Mr. Walker) took the line he did. I do not agree with his Socialism, but I like to think that we are in a position in this House, when we are...

Import Duties (Finance Act, 1936, and Import Duties Act, 1932). (22 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: The hon. Member accepts, I presume, that these associations work under a fixed price. Does he believe that prices should not be fixed for Admiralty contracts in the same way as they are for ordinary consumers?

Import Duties (Finance Act, 1936, and Import Duties Act, 1932). (22 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: The hon. Member ought not to make statements which are untrue. In the industry with which I am closely connected I have had considerable experience in the fixing of quotas, and they are not fixed in an arbitrary manner. It is a shame that that should go out as a fact. Prices are fixed on a definite, accepted production for years. They have been agreed by the whole industry and in exceptional...

Import Duties (Finance Act, 1936, and Import Duties Act, 1932). (22 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: The hon. Gentleman makes challenging statements which are not true. If he says that the price fixed by the Steel Association has as its "ceiling" the highest price of Continental material, and that the British price is plus 33⅓ per. cent., it is the most gross misstatement of fact I have ever heard in this House. At the present time the price is lower than the Continental price. The prices...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I find myself largely in agreement with many of the statements of the hon. Lady who has just spoken. She has, I think, expressed views and principles which are in the minds of a great many hon. Members. But when she complains that nothing has been done I would point to one passage in the White Paper which has not been referred to yet. It is on page 8 and it shows the reduction of unemployment...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I understand that 20,000 have been transferred, and I presume that they have found employment somewhere. If a man can find employment outside the Special Areas, I do not see any reason why he should not go and get it, and I feel that the prejudice against transference is very much overdone. My own family were yeoman farmers in Scotland, but only one son could take the farm and the others had...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I must apologise for having taken the Debate too broadly, but I did it because I felt that these rather broad considerations which I have been putting forward are absolutely inherent in any attempt to tackle the problem of the distressed areas, and particularly as we find that these areas are to be extended in certain directions. Perhaps I should have prefaced my remarks by saying that I do...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I am most grateful to the hon. Gentleman. That is what in essence I had in mind—the difficulty for a man to get back to employment if he has been out a long time and is over a certain age. A man of 35 to 64 who has been living in a certain district with his family is not the sort of person you can move about the countryside. It is difficult to take him and put him on a road job Too miles...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: It is a bad thing if they continue to be dependent on them.

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: The problem with regard to these 200,000 people is that unless we take quite separate and individual action with them they are going to become the lost legion of our generation. Every day, every week, every year that goes by makes their position more difficult. If you look at it from the point of view of 200,000 families, it is not such a big problem to deal with as that of the whole of the...

Special Areas [Money]. ( 9 Maw 1937)

Mr Charles Peat: I want to make three statements in answer to what the hon. Member has said. I did not suggest that all the new plants should be made to depend on the present plants. If I used any words that gave her that impression let me withdraw them. What I had in mind was that any extension should be on the best economic lines. There is a world shortage of steel to-day, and however much people clamour...


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