Canlyniadau 1–20 o 1250 ar gyfer speaker:Mr Moss Turner-Samuels

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Tach 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: Before we divide the Committee, it should be pointed out that if the Amendment were adopted the Clause would be quite unintelligible. I know that my hon. and learned Friend is very sincere about this. I know he wants to do what is right, and I think his anxiety is to make clear what he thinks is obscure at present.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Tach 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: But what his Amendment will succeed in doing if it is carried is to make obscure what is at present clear. The effect of the Clause, as he proposes it, would be that if the killing be unintentional, then killing shall not amount to murder unless it is intentional. That would be the terminological effect if my hon. and learned Friend's Amendment were substituted for the present wording—in...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Tach 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: That is not argument; that is abuse.

Oral Answers to Questions — Legal Aid and Advice (12 Tach 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: Would the hon. and learned Gentleman not agree that because of the absence of advice many cases are being brought which are a waste of public money and that many other cases are not being brought at all because people do not get the proper advice which they ought to have in order to enable them to launch the actions?

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 40. — (Broadcasts of Sound Recordings Cinematograph Films, and Diffusion of Broadcast Programmes.) (25 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: Does the hon. Gentleman agree that that Copyright Committee made no recommendation whatsoever along the lines of, or even approaching, the Government's Amendment?

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 40. — (Broadcasts of Sound Recordings Cinematograph Films, and Diffusion of Broadcast Programmes.) (25 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: This is very important, because it might narrow the margin of the disagreement between the hon. Gentleman and those who are seeking to protect the position of the relay services. The greatest service that could be done to the discussion now would be to define plainly what will now be the liability of the relay services.

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 40. — (Broadcasts of Sound Recordings Cinematograph Films, and Diffusion of Broadcast Programmes.) (25 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: I quite agree with the final observation of the hon. Member for Crosby (Mr. Page) when he referred to the kindness of the Assistant Postmaster-General. He is a most amiable person and is always ready to help. I believe that this afternoon when he endeavoured to explain this matter he did what he thought was just, but it is quite clear that in the result he is not in fact doing what is just....

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 40. — (Broadcasts of Sound Recordings Cinematograph Films, and Diffusion of Broadcast Programmes.) (25 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: —Yes, for thirty years, I am told. It has never once been suggested that there was anything wrong about it, or that there was an injustice to rectify. Indeed, in the original Measure, in another place, there was no such provision as is contained in this Government Amendment. It was only at a later stage that the matter was mentioned at all in quite an indeterminate form. It was,...

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 8. — (Special Exception in Respect of Records of Musical Works.) (24 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: If a man of straw was to be the central figure in this dramatis personœ which was to come before this public inquiry, I think that he would be the first person to be presented under whatever guise this inquiry, judicial or public, took place. Really all that the intervention of the Parliamentary Secretary does is to accentuate the weakness of the case which he is endeavouring to put forward....

Orders of the Day — COPYRIGHT BILL [Lords]: Clause 8. — (Special Exception in Respect of Records of Musical Works.) (24 Hyd 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: This is a two-way traffic, and the Parliamentary Secretary can have it either way. We are not concerned with the people who do not come before the arbitrator; we are concerned with the people who want to come before the arbitrator, who feel that they have a case and a cause and some just reason for coming before him. Such people would have just as much status if they came before an arbitrator...

Orders of the Day — Restrictive Trade Practices Bill: Clause 22. — (Rules of Procedure and Representation of Registrar.) (30 Gor 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: May I ask the Parliamentary Secretary a question? I listened to his explanation, but is not the effect of this Amendment merely to abolish the usual machinery of discovery and to enable the Court in these cases to get any relevant data or documentary evidence that might be required in deciding the matter in issue.

Orders of the Day — Restrictive Trade Practices Bill: Clause 22. — (Rules of Procedure and Representation of Registrar.) (30 Gor 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: I did not understand that at all, with respect to my hon. and learned Friend. It appeared to me from the explanation of the Parliamentary Secretary, and from the terminology of the Amendment, that it was addressed to the purpose of getting any relevant evidence or data whatsoever from any source, if the Court thought in these matters that that was necessary. I understood that in this way, it...

Orders of the Day — Restrictive Trade Practices Bill: New Clause A. — (Commencement of Part Ii.) (30 Gor 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: I do not think that my right hon. Friend the Member for Battersea, North (Mr. Jay) in any way used extravagant language. He put his finger on the essential and perhaps intentional weakness of the Bill. I put it to the Parliamentary Secretary that on this subject the Government are putting a shabby deal over the House. The Government have contended throughout that they are genuine about the...

Orders of the Day — Restrictive Trade Practices Bill: New Clause A. — (Commencement of Part Ii.) (30 Gor 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: The hon. Member for Heston and Isleworth (Mr. R. Harris) proposed the Amendment originally, and he could not even get a seconder. The Government would have nothing to do with it. Having been completely unable to do anything with it in this House its sponsors had the matter raised in another place where it was passed and sent here. Not only does it not now need a seconder, but the Government...

Road Traffic Bill: New Clause A. — (Control of Use of Footpaths and Bridleways for Motor-Vehicle Trials.) (30 Gor 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: The hon. Member for Crosby (Mr. Page) said that if anyone rode a bicycle upon a footpath abutting the highway he would not have to have third party insurance because he would not be riding upon the highway. That comes as a surprise to me. It is quite obvious that anyone riding a bicycle upon a highway and accidentally or in some way getting on to the footpath and injuring somebody would be liable.

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty.) (28 Meh 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: I am sure that the hon. and learned Member for Middlesbrough, West (Mr. Simon) considers that this Amendment is a good one and that it would assist in the administration of the law which would follow were this Bill placed on the Statute Book. But I think that the hon. and learned Gentleman asked for the soft impeachment which he received from my hon. Friend the Member for Nelson and Colne...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty.) (28 Meh 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: There is something very uncandid and unsavoury about the proceedings on the Amendment that we are discussing. As I understood what was said by my hon. Friend the Member for Nelson and Colne (Mr. S. Silverman)—I am sorry that he is not here—it was that he wanted to indulge the House in what, in my considered opinion, is an unsavoury piece of tactics to use. [HON. MEMBERS: "Oh."] I am sorry...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty.) (28 Meh 1956)

Mr Moss Turner-Samuels: I did not say that what the hon. Member for Hendon, South (Sir H. Lucas-Tooth) was doing was dishonest.


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